Climate Justice Cornell

Climate Change is a Social Justice Issue

Our student-run campaigns work to promote a sustainable, just future and advance policy on climate change on the university, local and national levels. We see Cornell as a leverage point for advancing wider regional-level change. Our campaign-based organizing structure develops our members as leading social movement organizers to address the challenges of our generation.

Current Events

Stop Line 3

The Line 3 Pipeline is currently under construction in Minnesota. Enbridge power company is rerouting the line, and not removing the old line (setting a very dangerous precedent). This pipeline disregards native treaties, and is incredibly dangerous to local indigenous people as out of state "man camps" stay on their land. Furthermore, the damaging the earth, causing deforestation, oil spills, and contaminating local food sources. For more information and action items, go to stopline3.org, honortheearth.org, and our Linktree

Pass the CCIA

The Climate and Community Investment Act (CCIA) will raise $15 billion per year from corporate polluters and use it to create good, green jobs, invest in frontline communities, and build a renewable economy for New York State. The bill was introduced into the New York State Senate on March 22, and the Political Action Committee is working with New York Renews to get it passed this legislative session. For more information and action items, visit NY Renews and our Linktree.

IC #openthebooks

CJC is currently supporting Ithaca College's #openthebooks campaign, which was organized by Students for Labor Action and the Contingent Faculty Union, is a response to the administration attempting to fire about 150 IC faculty and staff in the middle of a pandemic, which will leave them without healthcare and basic security amidst a global pandemic. Follow their Instagram here.

History

Climate Justice Cornell, formerly KyotoNOW! was formed in student response to the US rejection of the Kyoto Protocol in 2001. After demonstrations in Day Hall, the University became the first in the country to agree to independent participation in the international Protocol, eventually signing onto the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment, and finally carbon neutrality. Climate Justice Cornell’s beginning sparked a legacy of student engagement in continuing to push the University to position itself as a leader in sustainability. Climate Justice Cornell members in particular have consistently been student representatives in University- and wider community-level Sustainability task forces. Since our beginnings in climate and energy, we have also taken up other campaigns, often actively working in collaboration with other social justice groups to continue to push the University, our state, and our country towards a clean energy future.